Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a state of progressive memory loss after the age of 50 that is beyond what would be expected of normal aging but does not meet the criteria for a diagnosis of dementia (Peterson et al., 1999). People with MCI demonstrate:

  • Evidence of memory deficits that are abnormal for their age and educational level
  • Presence of otherwise normal general cognitive functioning
  • Normal performance of activities of daily living

MCI occurs in between 3 and 19 percent of seniors (Ritchie, Artero, & Tuchon, 2001). Research indicates that 11 to 80 percent of people with MCI will develop Alzheimer’s disease within five years (Peterson et al., 2001; Ritchie et al., 2001). These huge variations in estimates are largely due to differences in definitions of the syndrome. Although there is currently no treatment that will stop or reverse MCI, research is currently being conducted to test the effectiveness of medications to minimize memory impairment.

The above information was provided by the Society of Certified Senior Advisors (SCSA)